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Fluconazole Injection

Brand Name(s): | WHY is this medicine prescribed? | HOW should this medicine be used? | Are there OTHER USES for this medicine? | What SPECIAL DIETARY instructions should I follow? | What should I do IF I FORGET to take a dose? | What SIDE EFFECTS can this medicine cause? | What should I know about STORAGE and DISPOSAL of this medication? | What should I do in case of OVERDOSE? | What OTHER INFORMATION should I know? |

Brand Name(s):

  • Diflucan®

WHY is this medicine prescribed?

Fluconazole injection is used to treat fungal infections, including yeast infections of the mouth, throat, esophagus (tube leading from the mouth to the stomach), abdomen (area between the chest and waist), lungs, blood, and other organs. Fluconazole is also used to treat meningitis (infection of the membranes covering the brain and spine) caused by fungus. Fluconazole is also used to prevent yeast infections in patients who are likely to become infected because they are being treated with chemotherapy or radiation therapy before a bone marrow transplant (replacement of unhealthy spongy tissue inside the bones with healthy tissue). Fluconazole is in a class of antifungals called triazoles. It works by slowing the growth of fungi that cause infection.

HOW should this medicine be used?

Fluconazole injection comes as a solution (liquid) to be given through a needle or catheter placed in your vein. It is usually infused (injected slowly) intravenously (into a vein) over a period of 1 to 2 hours, usually once a day for up to 14 days. The length of your treatment depends on your condition and on how well you respond to fluconazole injection. Your doctor will tell you how long to use fluconazole injection.

Your doctor may tell you to use a higher dose of fluconazole injection on the first day of your treatment. Follow these directions carefully.

You may receive fluconazole injection in a hospital or you may use the medication at home. If you are using fluconazole injection at home, use it at around the same time every day. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or other health care provider to explain any part you do not understand. Use fluconazole injection exactly as directed. Do not infuse it more quickly than directed, and do not use more or less of it, or use it more often than prescribed by your doctor.

If you will be using fluconazole injection at home, your health care provider will show you how to infuse the medication. Be sure that you understand these directions, and ask your health care provider if you have any questions. Ask your health care provider what to do if you have any problems infusing fluconazole injection.

Before you administer fluconazole, look at the solution closely. It should be clear and free of floating material. Gently squeeze the bag or observe the solution container to make sure there are no leaks. Do not use the solution if it is discolored, if it contains particles, or if the bag or container leaks. Use a new solution, but show the damaged one to your health care provider.

You should begin to feel better during the first few days of treatment with fluconazole injection. If your symptoms do not improve or get worse, call your doctor.

Use fluconazole injection until your doctor tells you that you should stop, even if you feel better. If you stop using fluconazole injection too soon, your infection may come back after a short time.

Are there OTHER USES for this medicine?

Fluconazole injection is also sometimes used to treat serious fungal infections that begin in the lungs and can spread through the body and fungal infections of the eye, prostate (a male reproductive organ), skin and nails. Fluconazole injection is also sometimes used to prevent fungal infections in people who are likely to become infected because they have human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or cancer or have had a transplant operation (surgery to remove an organ and replace it with a donor or artificial organ). Talk to your doctor about the risks of using this medication for your condition.

This medication may be prescribed for other uses; ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

What SPECIAL PRECAUTIONS should I follow?

Before receiving fluconazole injection,

  • tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to fluconazole, other antifungal medications such as itraconazole (Sporanox), ketoconazole (Nizoral), posaconazole (Noxafil), or voriconazole (Vfend), any other medications, or any of the ingredients in fluconazole injection. Ask your pharmacist for a list of the ingredients.
  • tell your doctor if you are taking astemizole (Hismanal) (not available in the US), cisapride (Propulsid) (not available in the US), pimozide (Orap), quinidine (Quinidex), or terfenadine (Seldane) (not available in the US).Your doctor will probably tell you not to receive fluconazole injection if you are taking any of these medications.
  • tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking, or plan to take. Also you should tell your doctor you have used fluconazole injection before starting to take any new medications within 7 days of receiving fluconazole. Be sure to mention any of the following: amitriptyline; amphotericin B (Abelcet, AmBisome, Amphotec, Fungizone); anticoagulants ('blood thinners') such as warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven); benzodiazepines such as midazolam (Versed); calcium channel blockers such as amlodipine (Norvasc, in Caduet, in Lotrel), felodipine (Plendil, in Lexxel), isradipine (DynaCirc), and nifedipine (Adalat, Procardia); carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Epitol, Tegretol); celecoxib (Celebrex); cholesterol-lowering medications (statins) such as atorvastatin (Lipitor, in Caduet), fluvastatin (Lescol), and simvastatin (Zocor, in Simcor, in Vytorin); clopidogrel (Plavix); cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan); cyclosporine (Gengraf, Neoral, Sandimmune); diuretics ('water pills') such as hydrochlorothiazide (HydroDIURIL, Microzide); erythromycin (E.E.S., E-Mycin, Erythrocin); fentanyl (Actiq, Duragesic, Fentora, Sublimaze); isoniazid (INH, Nydrazid); losartan (Cozaar, in Hyzaar); methadone (Methadose); nevirapine (Viramune); nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others) and naproxen (Aleve, Anaprox, Naprelan); oral contraceptives (birth control pills); oral medication for diabetes such as glipizide (Glucotrol), glyburide (Diabeta, Micronase, Glycron, others), and tolbutamide (Orinase); nortriptyline (Pamelor); phenytoin (Dilantin, Phenytek); prednisone (Sterapred); rifabutin (Mycobutin); rifampin (Rifadin, Rimactane, in Rifamate, in Rifater); saquinavir (Invirase); sirolimus (Rapamune); tacrolimus (Prograf); theophylline (Elixophyllin, Theo-24, Uniphyl, others); triazolam (Halcion); valproic acid (Depakene, Depakote); vinblastine; vincristine; vitamin A; voriconazole (Vfend); and zidovudine (Retrovir). Your doctor may need to change the doses of your medications or monitor you carefully for side effects. Many other medications may also interact with fluconazole injection, so be sure to tell your doctor about all the medications you are taking, even those that do not appear on this list.
  • tell your doctor if you have or have ever had cancer; acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS); an irregular heartbeat; a low level of calcium, sodium, magnesium, or potassium in your blood; or heart, kidney, or liver disease.
  • tell your doctor if you are pregnant, especially if you are in the first 3 months of your pregnancy, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while receiving fluconazole injection, call your doctor. Fluconazole injection may harm the fetus.
  • if you are having surgery, including dental surgery, tell the doctor or dentist that you are using fluconazole injection.
  • you should know that fluconazole injection may make you dizzy or cause seizures. Do not drive a car or operate machinery until you know how this medication affects you.

What SPECIAL DIETARY instructions should I follow?

Unless your doctor tells you otherwise, continue your normal diet.

What should I do IF I FORGET to take a dose?

Infuse the missed dose as soon as you remember it. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and continue your regular dosing schedule. Do not infuse a double dose to make up for a missed one.

What SIDE EFFECTS can this medicine cause?

Fluconazole injection may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away:
  • headache
  • dizziness
  • diarrhea
  • stomach pain
  • heartburn
  • change in ability to taste food
Some side effects can be serious. If you experience any of these symptoms, call your doctor immediately or get emergency treatment:
  • nausea
  • vomiting
  • extreme tiredness
  • unusual bruising or bleeding
  • lack of energy
  • loss of appetite
  • pain in the upper right part of the stomach
  • yellowing of the skin or eyes
  • flu-like symptoms
  • dark urine
  • pale stools
  • seizures
  • rash
  • skin peeling
  • hives
  • itching
  • swelling of the face, throat, tongue, lips, eyes, hands, feet, ankles, or lower legs
  • difficulty breathing or swallowing

Fluconazole injection may cause other side effects. Call your doctor if you have any unusual problems while receiving this medication.

If you experience a serious side effect, you or your doctor may send a report to the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program online [at Web Site ] or by phone [1-800-332-1088].

What should I know about STORAGE and DISPOSAL of this medication?

Your healthcare provider will tell you how to store your medication. Store your medication only as directed. Make sure you understand how to store your medication properly. Throw away any medication that is outdated or no longer needed. Talk to your health care provider about the proper disposal of your medication.

Keep your supplies in a clean, dry place out of the reach of children when you are not using them. Your health care provider will tell you how to throw away used needles, syringes, tubing, and containers to avoid accidental injury.

What should I do in case of OVERDOSE?

In case of overdose, call your local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. If the victim has collapsed or is not breathing, call local emergency services at 911.

Symptoms of overdose may include the following:
  • hallucinations (seeing things or hearing voices that do not exist)
  • extreme fear that others are trying to harm you

What OTHER INFORMATION should I know?

Keep all appointments with your doctor and the laboratory. Your doctor may order certain lab tests to check your response to fluconazole injection.

Do not let anyone else use your medication. Your prescription is probably not refillable. If you still have symptoms of infection after you finish the fluconazole injection, call your doctor.

It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and nonprescription (over-the-counter) medicines you are taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring this list with you each time you visit a doctor or if you are admitted to a hospital. It is also important information to carry with you in case of emergencies.

AHFS® Consumer Medication Information. © Copyright, The American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc., 7272 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, Maryland. All Rights Reserved. Duplication for commercial use must be authorized by ASHP.

Selected Revisions: December 15, 2011.

 

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