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Screening for Urinary Tract Infection (UTI)

En Español (Spanish Version)

Main Page | Risk Factors | Symptoms | Diagnosis | Treatment | Screening | Reducing Your Risk | Talking to Your Doctor | Living With UTI | Resource Guide

The purpose of screening is early diagnosis and treatment. Screening tests are given to people without current symptoms, but who may be at high risk for certain diseases or conditions.

Screening Guidelines

There are no current screening guidelines for UTIs. However, a doctor may do screening tests under certain circumstances. These may include:

  • Pregnant women during the first trimester
  • People with diabetes
  • Well-child check-ups or routine adult physicals

Screening tests for urinary tract infection (UTI) include:

  • Urine dip—A dipstick coated with special chemicals is dipped into the urine sample. Areas on it change color to indicate the presence of blood, pus, bacteria, or other materials. This is a quick, general test.
  • Microscopic urinalysis—The urine is examined under a microscope for the presence and quantity of materials such as red blood cells, white blood cells (pus), and bacteria. This is a more accurate way to diagnose a urinary tract infection.


  • Uncomplicated urinary tract infection (UTI) (pyelonephritis and cystitis). EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: Updated August 23, 2014. Accessed September 17, 2014.
  • Urinary tract infections in adults. American Urological Association Foundation website. Available at: Accessed September 17, 2014.
  • Urinary tract infections in adults. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases website. Available at: Updated May 24, 2012. Accessed September 17, 2014.

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