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Conditions InDepth: Infertility in Women

En Español (Spanish Version)

Main Page | Risk Factors | Symptoms | Diagnosis | Treatment | Screening | Reducing Your Risk | Talking to Your Doctor | Resource Guide

Infertility in women is a disorder of the reproductive system that prevents the body’s ability to ovulate and conceive. Recurrent pregnancy loss is often considered a type of infertility. A heterosexual couple is considered infertile when they have not conceived after a full year of regular sexual intercourse without using contraception. Couple infertility may be due to male factors, female factors, or a combination of both.

A successful pregnancy involves many steps. First, a healthy egg must be released from a woman’s ovaries and travel to the fallopian tube. There, a man’s sperm fertilizes it. If fertilization occurs, the fertilized egg then moves down the fallopian tube to the uterus. The embryo secures itself to the uterine wall. This begins the 38-40 week journey from embryo to fetus to baby. Problems can occur at anytime during this process.

Female Reproductive Organs

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Infertility affects an estimated 10% of women aged 15-44 in the United States. Age-related ability to have a successful pregnancy is well documented. Success rates begin to decline at age 35 and are severely reduced by age 40 in women.

Common causes of infertility in women include:

  • Menstrual cycle dysfunction—the most common cause of infertility in women due to failure to ovulate
  • Problems with ovulation—something affects the development and release of an egg by the ovary
  • Fallopian tube blockage—present from birth or may result from surgery, trauma, or infection in the pelvic area
  • Endometriosis—results when tissue from the uterine lining is found outside the uterus

What are the risk factors for infertility in women? | What are the symptoms of infertility in women? | How is infertility in women diagnosed? | What are the treatments for infertility in women? | Are there screening tests for infertility in women? | How can I reduce my risk of infertility? | What questions should I ask my doctor? | What is it like to live with infertility? | Where can I get more information about infertility in women?

 

References:

  • Diabetes and women. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists website. Available at: http://www.acog.org/~/media/For%20Patients/faq142.pdf?dmc=1&ts=20121022T1326109439. Published August 2011. Accessed January 7, 2014.
  • Infertility. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed. Updated November 5, 2013. Accessed January 7, 2014.

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