beth israel deaconess medical center a harvard medical school teaching hospital

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Dr. Samir Parikh

Parikh Laboratory

 
Dr. Parikh's laboratory investigates molecular mechanisms in the biology of critical illness.   Among its other tasks, the kidney is responsible for the filtration of waste products from the blood; rapid shutdown of this filtration function affects up to one-third of individuals with sepsis. The combination of sepsis and acute kidney injury is associated with a mortality of 50-80%. Despite this, its pathogenesis is poorly understood. We are interested in determining the unique factors that render the kidney vulnerable during sepsis. Our laboratory uses in vitro, in vivo, and human subject-based studies to address these questions with a multi-faceted approach.

Dysregulation of Circulation during Sepsis

 Sepsis is a common, deadly syndrome that arises from disseminated infection. Derangements in the circulatory system during sepsis lead to shock and multi-organ dysfunction, the most common causes of death from sepsis. Through work from our group and others, the endothelium has become increasingly recognized as target cell that mediates several of the circulatory changes in sepsis. One molecular pathway, the angiopoietin/Tie-2 system, appears to play a major role in the regulation of vascular permeability, endothelial inflammation, and vascular tone, making it a prime candidate for the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic tools for sepsis.

Sepsis-induced Acute Kidney Injury


Among its other tasks, the kidney is responsible for the filtration of waste products from the blood; rapid shutdown of this filtration function affects up to one-third of individuals with sepsis. The combination of sepsis and acute kidney injury is associated with a mortality of 50-80%. Despite this, its pathogenesis is poorly understood. We are interested in determining the unique factors that render the kidney vulnerable during sepsis. Our laboratory uses in vitro, in vivo, and human subject-based studies to address these questions with a multi-faceted approach.