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Zolt Arany Laboratory

Zolt Arany, MD, PhD

CardioVascular Institute
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
3 Blackfan Circle, E/CLS906
Boston MA 02215
Tel: 617-735-4252
e-mail: zarany@bidmc.harvard.edu

Education/Training/Appointments:

• BA, Biochemical Sciences, Harvard College, 1989
• PhD, Biological and Biochemical Sciences, Harvard University, 1995
• MD, Medicine, Harvard Medical School, 1998
• Internship in Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, 1999
• Residency in Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, 2001
• Fellowship in Cardiovascular Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, 2005

Research Interests:

Dr. Arany's lab focuses on the gene regulatory events underlying cardiovascular metabolism.   The heart and skeletal muscle are highly metabolic tissues that require abundant energy, and aberrant energy production in either of these tissues can lead to disease, including heart failure, muscular dystrophy, cachexia.  The lab currently focuses on understanding the role of the PGC-1 family of coactivators in the regulation of metabolism in cardiac and skeletal muscle.  The PGC-1 proteins are powerful regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis and other metabolic programs in various tissues, including heart and muscle.  In addition, we have recently shown that PGC-1alpha also regulates angiogenesis, thereby coordinating delivery of oxygen and nutrients with their consumption in mitochondria.

Highlighted Recent Publications:

  • Arany Z. PGC-1 Coactivators and Skeletal Muscle Adaptations in Health and Disease. Current Opinions in Genetics and Development. 2008. In press.

  • Arany, Z., S.-Y. Foo, Y. Ma, J. Ruas, A. Bommi-Reddy, G. Girnun, M. Cooper, D. Laznik, J. Chinsomboon, S. Rangwala, K. H. Baek, A. Rosenzweig, and B.M. Spiegelman. (2008) “HIF-independent regulation of VEGF and angiogenesis by the transcriptional coactivator PGC-1α.” Nature. 451: 1008-13.

  • Arany Z, Wagner BK, Ma Y, Chinsomboon J, Laznik D, and Spiegelman BM. (2008) “Gene expression-based screening identifies microtubule inhibitors as inducers of PGC-1α and oxidative phosphorylation.” Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 2008; 105: 4721-6

  • Arany, Z., H. He, J. Lin, K. Hoyer, C. Handschin, O. Toka, F. Ahmad, T. Matsui, S. Chin, P.-H. Wu, I. I. Rybkin, J. M. Shelton, M. Manieri, S. Cinti, F. J. Schoen, R. Bassel-Duby, A. Rosenzweig, J. S. Ingwall, and B. M. Spiegelman (2005) “Transcriptional coactivator PGC-1a controls the energy state and contractile function of cardiac muscle”. Cell Metabolism, 1: 259-271.

  • Arany, Z., M. Novikov, S. Chin, Y. Ma, A. Rosenzweig, and B. M. Spiegelman (2006) “Transverse aortic constriction leads to accelerated heart failure in mice lacking PGC-1α”. PNAS, 103:10086-89.