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Program Leadership

Mark Lawrence Zeidel, MD

Chairman, Department of Medicine 

Dr.ZeidelOn July 1, 2005, Dr. Zeidel was appointed the Herrman Ludwig Blumgart Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Physician-in-Chief and Chairman of the Department of Medicine at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC), Boston, Massachusetts.

Dr. Zeidel was born at the Beth Israel Hospital and grew up in Natick, Massachusetts. After graduating from Phillips Exeter Academy in Exeter, New Hampshire, Dr. Zeidel received simultaneous Bachelor's and Master's degrees in Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry from Yale, graduating summa cum laude. Dr. Zeidel is a graduate of Columbia University's College of Physicians and Surgeons. He was elected to the medical honor society, Alpha Omega Alpha, and also received the Robert Loeb Award for "excellence in clinical medicine." Dr. Zeidel completed his internship and residency in Internal Medicine and his fellowship in Nephrology at the Brigham and Women's Hospital, receiving much of his research training at the Beth Israel Hospital. After training, he remained on faculty until 1993, serving as section chief in Nephrology at the West Roxbury VA Medical Center. Dr. Zeidel moved on to serve as Chief of the Renal-Electrolyte Division in the Department of Medicine at the University of Pittsburgh. In 1996 he was named interim Chair of the Department and was shortly appointed to the Jack D. Myers Professor and Chair of the Department of Medicine.

Dr. Zeidel's research focuses on mechanisms of water and small molecule flow across biological membranes and on mechanisms of epithelial injury. The first measurements of intracellular pH in renal cells, the discovery that atrial natriuretic peptide and related peptides (such as brain natriuretic peptide) function by blocking renal sodium reabsorption in collecting duct cells, the reconstitution and biophysical definition of the function of aquaporin water channels and the molecular definition of how membranes can be impermeable to gases and water are a few of the major research findings in his laboratories. Dr. Zeidel's research has been recognized by the American Physiological Society, American Society for Clinical Investigation and the Association of American Physicians. His research has received continuous funding by the NIH for over 20 years.

Dr. Zeidel brings great experience in the areas of clinical care, teaching, and administrative management. The Department of Medicine at the University of Pittsburgh was the first in the United States to appoint a Vice Chair for Quality Improvement during Dr. Zeidel's term as Chair. He spearheaded and implemented a new curriculum at the University of Pittsburgh Medical School to enhance the teaching of residents and fellows. He has made an extremely significant impact on the amount of grants and funds allocated for research. Simultaneously, he has enhanced clinical activity and doubled the Department's revenue.

Dr. Zeidel has served on numerous national committees and boards, and in leadership roles in national organizations. In these settings he has helped define how residency education can be funded in academic medical centers, how mentorship can be improved for future clinical investigators, and how departments of medicine can lead in improving the quality of care.

With this background, the search committee chose Dr. Zeidel to serve as the Herrman L. Blumgart Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, the Chair of its Department of Medicine at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, and the Physician-in-Chief at Beth Israel Deaconess. Dr. Zeidel's widely recognized clinical and administrative successes are solid proof that he will be a wonderful asset to the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, the Internal Medicine Residency Training Program, and the Department of Medicine for many years to come.

In response to questions regarding future plans for the Department of Medicine, here is what Dr. Zeidel had to say: "This is an outstanding department of medicine that provides wonderful patient care and superb clinical and research teaching and performs truly important and innovative research. As one of the elite institutions nationally, we are entrusted every year with the very finest trainees at all levels, and we will work to ensure that we provide the very best learning environment for them. We will continue to innovate in delivering excellent, high quality care, and, with the advent of new laboratory space, will build additional exceptionally strong research groups to augment our already superb research portfolio."

Dr. Zeidel's wife, Dr. Susan D. Freedman, is a general internist who practices full time. They have twin daughters who graduated Exeter and recently graduated from Harvard and Yale, and a younger son, also an Exonian, who now attends Tufts.

Eileen E. Reynolds, MD

Chief of the Division of General Internal Medicine
Vice-Chair for Education, Department of Medicine

Dr. Reynolds is the Vice Chair for Education, overseeing the educational programs at all levels throughout the department. In addition, she is the Chief of the Division of General Internal Medicine and Faculty Director of the Linde Family Fellowship in Primary Care Leadership. Her research activities relate to feedback, evaluation, and mentorship of residents; her clinical practice is in general internal medicine and women's health. 

Dr. Reynolds graduated from Harvard College magna cum laude in History and Science, and went on to receive her medical degree from Harvard Medical School. She served as an intern and resident in primary care internal medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, and then stayed on as a faculty member. After a fellowship in General Internal Medicine at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, she joined the faculty at Penn, where she created and served as the initial Program Director for their Primary Care Internal Medicine Residency Program. An accomplished teacher, she has won teaching awards as a faculty member at UCSF, Penn, and Harvard Medical School. In 2010, she won the ACGME's highest teaching award, the Parker Palmer Courage to Teach Award.

Dr. Reynolds is a national leader in medical education. She served a 7-year term on the Residency Review Committee in Internal Medicine, including one year as Vice Chair. During her term, she chaired the committee to rewrite the program requirements that govern residency education in internal medicine. She has participated in numerous efforts of the American College of Physicians, the American Board of Internal Medicine, and the Society of General Internal Medicine to define the future of the specialty and of residency training. She is currently the general internal medicine member on the national council of the Association of Specialty Professors (ASP).  

She is currently the Immediate-Past President of SGIM, where she just finished a year as President of the organization. Dr. Reynolds is married to Dr. Daniel Deschler, a head and neck cancer surgeon; their two boys are now 18 and 20.

Christopher Smith, MD

Director, Internal Medicine Training Program
Associate Chair for Education, Department of Medicine

Christopher Smith, MD

Dr. Christopher Smith is a general internist in the Division of General Medicine and Primary Care at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and an Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School.  He received a BS degree in biology with presidential honors from Loyola University and his MD degree from the University of Tennessee College of Medicine. He completed a residency in internal medicine at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.  After serving as Chief Medical Resident, Dr. Smith completed the Rabkin Fellowship in Medical Education at the Shapiro Institute for Education and Research and Harvard Medical School.

Prior to becoming Program Director, Dr. Smith was the program’s Senior Associate Director, served as the director of assessment and evaluation, and was Chief of the Blumgart Medical Firm. He also served as the co-Director of the Rabkin Fellowship in Medical Education, a year-long fellowship designed to help Harvard faculty become medical education leaders.  He is the Director of the Clinician Educator Track for residents, a novel program that helps internal medicine residents develop the skills needed to succeed as future clinician educators; he also cares for a large panel of patients as a primary care physician.

Dr. Smith directs and teaches in several national and international courses on clinical and educational topics.  He has published in a variety of areas, including the evaluation and treatment of musculoskeletal injuries, the teaching and assessment of procedural skills, and medical complications associated with statin medication use in the primary care setting.  Recent research endeavors include identifying predictors of success in residency training, creating methods for effective clinical hand-offs, and studying the correlation of clinical and educational skills.

Dr. Smith is the recipient of several teaching awards, including the Herrman L. Blumgart Faculty Award, the Robert C. Moellering, Jr. Award for contributions as teacher, clinician, and researcher, the Society of General Internal Medicine National Award for Scholarship in Medical Education, and the S. Robert Stone Award for Excellence in Teaching at Harvard Medical School.

Dr. Smith is married to an art teacher with whom he has a daughter in high school.  He enjoys traveling with his wife and daughter, as well as running, kayaking and skiing.

Anjala Tess

Associate Chair for Education, Department of Medicine

Dr. Tess is a hospitalist in the Division of General Medicine and Primary Care in the Department of Medicine at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. She attended Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, where she received a Sc. B. in chemistry. She attended medical school at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and subsequently completed her internship and residency at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.

As a hospitalist, Dr. Tess currently teaches on the medical wards and is Director of Education for the Hospital Medicine Program. She has completed a Rabkin Fellowship in Medical Education and an Academy Fellowship in Medical Education at Harvard Medical School. She created the BIDMC hospital medicine elective, which gives residents a chance to explore hospital medicine as a career. She also directs our novel Stoneman Elective in Patient Safety, and created a program-wide housestaff curriculum. She is Director of Quality and Safety for GME with oversight of all residencies at BIDMC and is Program Director of the HMS Patient Safety Fellowship through CRICO. 

Margaret “Molly” Hayes, MD

Associate Director, Internal Medicine Training Program

Dr. Hayes is an Instructor in Medicine at Harvard Medical School and a pulmonary and critical care attending in the Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine at BIDMC. She received her BS in Biology from Boston College where she was named a Scholar of the College. She obtained her medical degree from Tufts University School of Medicine and then completed Internal Medicine and Pulmonary and Critical Care training at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, MD. She also served as Assistant Chief of Service (Chief Resident) for one year at Johns Hopkins.

She has completed the Rabkin Fellowship in Medical Education and the Harvard Medical School Fellowship in medical education research. She serves as the director of medical critical care education at BIDMC and is the Director for External Education in the Carl J. Shapiro Institute for Education and Research. Her clinical and research interests are in critical care education, end of life care in the ICU and communication. She is on  the American Thoracic Society Education Committee and the nominating committee of the Section of Medical Education.

Dr. Hayes is active in teaching learners of all levels from UME where she is the director of the Intensive Care Medicine Clerkship to CME where she is the director of the Harvard CME course, Principles of Critical Care Medicine for Non Intensive Care Specialists. Dr. Hayes regularly works with residents in the medical ICU and serves as a mentor to many residents conducting educational research. She won the Hermann L Blumgart Faculty Teaching award in 2017.

Alicia Clark, MD

Associate Director, Internal Medicine Training Program

Dr. Alicia (Lish) Clark is returning to BIDMC as an Associate Program Director for the Internal Medicine Residency Program and a Hospitalist in the Division of General Medicine and Primary Care. She completed her residency training at BIDMC in 2010 and joined the Hospital Medicine Program. She was awarded BIDMC Hospital Medicine Clinician of the Year in 2011 and was an inpatient chief resident in 2011-2012 before leaving to join her husband during his training at Duke University Medical Center.

In 2015, she was nominated for the Master Clinician Educator Award at Duke and joined the residency program leadership as an associate program director from 2014-2017. In this role, she developed educational curriculum in patient safety, high value care and quality improvement. She has been leading interdisciplinary quality improvement projects and working to engage residents across GME. Her academic interests include medical education, patient safety, quality improvement, high value care, professional development and mentorship for residents.

Grace Huang, MD

Associate Director, Internal Medicine Training Program

Dr. Huang is an associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and a hospitalist in the Division of General Medicine and Primary Care in the Department of Medicine at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. She received a BA degree in English and a BS degree in Biological Sciences from Stanford University in 1995, and the MD degree from Washington University in St. Louis in 1999. She subsequently completed her internship and residency at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.

She completed a Rabkin Fellowship in Medical Education in 2003, an Academy Fellowship in Medical Education at Harvard Medical School in 2006, and a Picker Fellowship in evidence-based medicine in 2011. She now directs the Rabkin Fellowship and also serves as the co-director of the BIDMC Academy of Medical Educators and Director of Assessment for the Center for Education at BIDMC, where she provides faculty development and project mentorship to BIDMC faculty and residents in instrument design, program evaluation, and scholarly writing.  Her research interests are in procedural competence assessment, critical thinking, cognitive error, and high value care. She is also Editor-in-Chief for MedEdPORTAL, an editorial board member for the journals Academic Medicine and Simulation in Healthcare, and an associate editor for NEJM Journal Watch Hospital Medicine.

Kenneth Mukamal, MD

Associate Director, Internal Medicine Training Program

Dr. Kenneth MukamalDr. Mukamal is a general internist and clinician-investigator in the Division of General Medicine and Primary Care at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Mukamal received his undergraduate education at Washington University in St. Louis, followed by a master’s degree in cellular and molecular biology at UCLA. He completed medical school at UCSF and residency training in internal medicine at Yale-New Haven Hospital. After one year as a hospitalist and two years as an outpatient clinician-educator, Dr. Mukamal completed the Harvard Faculty Development and Fellowship Program in General Internal Medicine and received his MPH from the Harvard Chan School of Public Health, where he now serves as a Visiting Scientist in Nutrition.  Since his fellowship, he has conducted clinical and population-based research, focused particularly on alcohol consumption and other determinants of cardiovascular disease.  He chaired the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Expert Panel on Alcohol and Chronic Disease Epidemiology in 2011 and was elected to the American Society for Clinical Investigation in 2012.

Dr. Mukamal has directed the research curriculum for residents since 2006.  In recognition of his role training residents, students, and fellows, he received the 2012 A. Clifford Barger Excellence in Mentoring Award from Harvard Medical School.

Anita Vanka, MD

Associate Director, Internal Medicine Training Program

Dr. Anita Vanka is an Associate Program Director for the BIDMC Internal Medicine Residency Program and a Hospitalist in the Division of General Medicine and Primary Care in the Department of Anita Vanka Medicine. She received her medical degree with Honors from the University of Illinois in 2005. She completed her residency at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and subsequently served as Primary Care Chief Medical Resident from 2008-2009, prior to joining the Section of Hospital Medicine at BIDMC.

Dr. Vanka completed the Rabkin Fellowship in Medical Education from 2011-2012, during which she created a novel 3-year Transitions in Care Curriculum for all residents.  In addition to her GME leadership activities and working regularly with the residents on the general medical wards, she is directly involved with teaching at the UME level as well.  She serves as the Site Director for the Transition to the PCE course, an Associate Site Director for the Practice of Medicine course, and lead PCE Advisor for the PCE (Principal Clinical Experience). She was the recipient of the S. Robert Stone Award for Excellence in Teaching at Harvard Medical School in 2017.

Christina Wee, MD, MPH

Associate Chief of Research, Division of General Medicine and Primary Care
Associate Director, Internal Medicine Training Program

Dr. Christina C. Wee is Associate Professor of Medicine and Associate Chief of Research in the Division of General Medicine and Primary Care at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. Dr. Wee received her BS degree in Chemistry from Ursinus College where she graduated magna cum laude and her MD degree from Jefferson Medical College. Dr. Wee completed her residency training at University of Texas Southwestern and then completed the Harvard General Medicine Fellowship Program in 1999 where she also earned an MPH degree from the Harvard School of Public Health. In addition to her role leading research training in the residency program, she is the Program-Director of the Harvard-wide General Medicine Faculty Development Fellowship Program since 2012 and leads the Division’s research program in Obesity.

Dr. Wee has led several NIH funded studies including a study of the role of race on health outcomes and costs associated with obesity and a multicenter study to examine patient preferences, decision-making and long-term health and quality of life outcomes associated with bariatric surgery. In addition, Dr. Wee is broadly interested in health disparities and health promotion research and has mentored several trainees in areas such as immigrant and women’s health, cancer screening, and medical decision-making. Her research and mentorship ability is nationally recognized. She is the recipient of a NIH Midcareer Mentorship K24 Award, the 2010 HMS A. Clifford Barger Award for Excellence in Mentoring, and the 2011 Society of General Internal Medicine (SGIM) Midcareer Research and Mentorship Award. She was also inducted into the American Society of Clinical Investigation in 2012. Dr. Wee is a former deputy editor of the Journal of General Internal Medicine and served on their editorial board. She also chaired the SGIM Research Committee.

Jason Freed, MD

Assistant Director, Internal Medicine Training Program

Dr. Jason Freed is a hematologist and clinician-educator at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. Dr. Freed grew up in central Florida and received his B.S. and M.D. degrees from the University of Florida. He then completed his residency in internal medicine at Beth Israel Deaconess in Boston where he won the Lowell McGee Award for Teaching, and was chosen to serve as chief resident. He completed his fellowship in hematology-oncology at Beth Israel Deaconess before joining the staff as a hematologist. In addition to treating patients with a diverse array of benign and malignant hematologic disorders he also attends on the bone marrow transplant service.

He has a number of educational leadership roles at BIDMC and Harvard Medical School including serving as the assistant program director for the internal medicine residency training program. He is the hematology course director for “Physiology on the Fly”, a nationally renowned faculty development program for internists, taught at Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory. He also is the founding director of the BIDMC Clinician-Educator Track for medicine subspecialty fellows, the first of its kind. Dr. Freed is a nationally invited speaker on the use of cognitive learning theory in medical education. He is a regular discussant in residency conferences on questions involving hematology and oncology, and he helps design the intern and resident schedules.

Daniel Ricotta, MD

Director, Medical Simulation, Department of Medicine

Dr. Daniel Ricotta is an academic hospitalist at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Instructor in Medicine at Harvard Medical School. He completed his residency training at BIDMC where he was a member of the Clinician Educator Track and recently completed a Rabkin Fellowship in Medical Education, where he implemented a “resident as leader” curriculum.

Dr. Ricotta is Associate Director of the Principal Clinical Experience for Harvard Medical School where he also co-directs the 3rd year integration track, aimed at improving medical students’ critical thinking skills, and the high-value care, and student-as-teacher electives as well. Dr. Ricotta is also Director of Medical Simulation for the Department of Medicine at BIDMC. Nationally, he serves as course director for “Physiology on the Fly,” a faculty development program held at Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratories in Maine. Dr. Ricotta’s research focuses on clinical innovation, procedural training, and team-work communication.

Jonathan Crocker, MD

Assistant Director, Internal Medicine Training Program
Program Director, Global Health Program

Dr. Jonathan CrockerDr. Jonathan Crocker is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and a hospitalist at BIDMC.  He received his medical degree from UMass Medical School and completed his residency and chief residency at Boston Medical Center in 2001. After working as a primary care clinician at Massachusetts General Hospital for nearly six years, Dr. Crocker moved to rural Malawi as Director of Clinical Services with Abwenzi Pa Za Umoyo (Partners In Health), Malawi. In this role, he supported and augmented clinical services focused on HIV, TB and malaria at the district level, oversaw the creation of Chronic Care and Kaposi Sarcoma clinics, and supported the growth of medical inpatient services at Neno district hospital after it was built.

Dr. Crocker joined the BIDMC medicine faculty in the summer of 2009. He completed a Rabkin Fellowship in Medical Education in 2011-2012. He directs the Global Health Program (track and elective) with the internal medicine residency program, and directs a new global health fellowship in medicine at BIDMC. Dr. Crocker's academic interests include health care delivery in resource-poor settings, mentorship of residents in global health activities, resident and hospitalist procedural training, and graduate medical education. 

Samir M. Parikh, MD

Resident Research Liaison, Internal Medicine Training Program

Dr. Samir ParikhDr. Samir Parikh serves as an Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, as a staff physician in the Division of Nephrology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and as a principal investigator with joint affiliations in the Division of Nephrology and the Center for Vascular Biology Research.  His research is focused on molecular mechanisms underlying acute kidney injury and sepsis.  His group described Angiopoietin-2 as a candidate marker and mediator of vascular leakage and adverse outcomes in sepsis. Further, they have shown that inhibition of Angiopoietin-2 ameliorates microvascular injury and AKI in models of sepsis. In more recent studies,

The Parikh laboratory has explored the molecular basis of tubule pathology in sepsis, implicating mitochondrial biogenesis as a novel pathway for recovery from AKI. Ongoing studies are examining the intersection of epithelial and endothelial signaling in the kidney and exploring mechanistic links between AKI, CKD, and aging. Dr. Parikh graduated magna cum laude from Harvard with a degree in chemistry and received the Founder’s Medal from Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. He completed post-graduate medical training at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School. Dr. Parikh has served as principal investigator on research grants from the National Institutes of Health, American Society of Nephrology, American Heart Association, and American Diabetes Association.

Julius Yang, MD

Director of Quality, BIDMC

Julius Yang, MDDr. Yang is a hospitalist in the Division of General Medicine and Primary Care at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and an instructor in medicine at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Yang completed his undergraduate education at Williams College, and then earned a Ph.D. in physical chemistry at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He attended medical school at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. He completed his residency training in internal medicine at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC), at the conclusion of which he was awarded the Kathy Swan Ginsburg Award for humanism in medicine.

After serving one year as a chief resident at BIDMC, Dr. Yang completed a Fellowship in Medical Education at the Carl J. Shapiro Institute for Education and Research. In his role as a hospitalist, Dr. Yang actively teaches and mentors residents, interns, and medical students while providing clinical care to patients hospitalized at BIDMC. He was awarded the Herrman L. Blumgart Faculty Award in 2005 for his contributions to housestaff education and professional development. Dr. Yang serves as the Director of Inpatient Quality for the Department of Health Care Quality at BIDMC, serves as chair of the BIDMC Resuscitation Committee and Inpatient Clinical Applications IT Committee, and is a core faculty member in medical simulation training at BIDMC.

Contact Information

Residency Training Program
Internal Medicine
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
West Campus, Deaconess Building, Suite 306
One Deaconess Road
Boston, MA 02215
617-632-8273
617-632-8261
medinternship@bidmc.harvard.edu