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Katherine Swan Ginsburg Faculty

Katherine Swan Ginsburg Humanism in Medicine Program Associate Faculty

Annie Banks, MSW, LICSW
Sigall Bell, MD
Heidi Blake, MD
Mary Buss, MD
Rob Cohen, MD
Michael Curry, MD
Tom Delbanco, MD
Reed Drews, MD
Michelle Dossett, MD, PhD
Grace Farris, MD
Jerome Groopman, MD
Leonor Fernandez, MD
Pamela Hartzband, MD
Julie Knopp, NP
Wendy McHugh, RN, MS
Laura Rock, MD
Amy Ship, MD
Joseph Wright, MD

Annie Banks, MSW, LICSW

Ms. Banks is a Senior Social Worker at BIDMC who has been practicing in the field of medical social work for more than 20 years. Prior to her arrival in 2005, Ms. Banks worked for more than a decade providing care to home hospice patients and their loved ones in the Boston area, as well as community, student, and professional education pertaining to multiple aspects of end-of-life care and bereavement. Ms. Banks joined the Palliative Care Consultation Service at BIDMC in 2005 to expand upon the service's existing commitment to addressing the psychological, emotional, social, and spiritual needs of patients, families, and staff as they face serious illness and death.  Ms. Banks spearheaded development of the medical center's bereavement program and, in 2008, development of the Palliative Care Volunteer Visitor Program - created to mitigate the feelings of isolation many seriously ill and dying patients experience during hospitalization. She was integral in bringing the Care Channel to BIDMC - a television channel offering scenes of nature and relaxation music as an alternative to regular programming - and she acts as a supervisor for musicians in BIDMC's Healing Harp Program. Ms. Banks is also a Reiki practitioner who offers the relaxing experience of Reiki to palliative care patients, education about the potential value of integrative therapy to others, and is presently co-leading a team developing a Reiki Volunteer Pilot Program at BIDMC.Along with fellow KSG Associate Faculty, Julie Knopp, NP, and Dr. Eileen Reynolds of the BIDMC Medical Residency Program, Annie developed and continues to coordinate Intern Forum - a monthly mutual support and discussion group providing interns with the opportunity to share their experiences as developing physicians. Also with Julie Knopp, Annie facilitates monthly Palliative Care Rounds with house staff involved in oncology and hematology rotations and Reflection & Renewal Rounds, which provide a venue for a multidisciplinary group of providers involved in a particularly interesting or challenging case to share their experiences with other professionals. In addition, Ms. Banks has developed a communication skills training program for Oncology Fellows and other physicians-in-training at BIDMC - Talk, Tactics, & Tact - with colleagues Dr. Mary Buss, Dr. Laurie Rosenblatt, and Frank McCaffrey, LICSW, and she remains an active educator of physicians, nurses, social workers, pastoral care providers and other medical professionals, speaking frequently within and beyond the medical center. Annie is a recipient of one of the Kenneth B. Schwartz Center's Compassionate Caregiver Awards in 2010, has served on the Ethics Committee of the Hospice and Palliative Care Federation of MA, and is a member of the Association for Death Education & Counseling, the Social Work in Palliative Care Network, and the Society for the Arts in Healthcare. Additional areas of professional interest are, variation in cultural and spiritual perspectives on end-of-life and bereavement, the impact of surrogate end-of-life decision-making on bereavement, and use of the arts as a catalyst for resilience and change.

Sigall Bell, MD

Dr. Bell completed her undergraduate studies at the University of California, Berkeley, graduating summa cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa in Molecular and Cell Biology. While at UC Berkeley, she was the recipient of several national scholar-athlete awards, a 4-time Academic All-American, an NCAA National Championships gymnast, and a member of the US gymnastics team at the World Maccabiah Games. She earned her M.D. from Harvard Medical School, and completed her residency training in Internal Medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) in Boston, MA. After serving as Chief Medical Resident at BWH, she studied at the London School of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, and contributed to public health and clinical efforts in Costa Rica, Ecuador, Honduras, Brazil, Israel, and South Africa to better understand the HIV epidemic and patients' experience of illness on a global scale. She completed her fellowship in Infectious Diseases at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) in Boston, MA, where she now practices, focusing on HIV care. Her recent book "Biography of AIDS" focuses on historical, social, medical, and political aspects of the HIV epidemic - as part of an integrated curriculum for high school students. She is the BIDMC site director for the Harvard Medical School Patient-Doctor III course, and former director of a medical student Writing Program. Both courses emphasize reflective practice and humanism in medicine. Interested in understanding what patients, families, and clinicians experience following medical error, she co-developed a curriculum based on filmed narratives of patients and families across the country who experienced harmful mistakes. As part of a national "Train the Trainer" program, she provided educational leaders with key tools to teach this curriculum focusing on the human dimensions of error in their own institutions, and studied doctors' and students' experiences with disclosure, in order to promote transparent communication that improves patient safety. As a recipient of the Arnold P. Gold Professorship, her research also probes the effects of organizational culture and the "hidden curriculum" - the customs that shape communication and moral decision-making in the clinical learning environment - on patient safety and humanism.  As a co-investigator on an AHRQ grant examining specific barriers to implementation of Disclosure and Offer programs in Massachusetts, she aims to help develop systems that promote the healing process by supporting and compensating patients and families in the aftermath of medical error. She is Co-Director of Patient Safety and Quality Initiatives at the Institute for Professionalism and Ethical Practice, Children's Hospital Boston, whose mission it is to promote relational learning that integrates patient and family perspectives and the everyday ethics of clinical practice. There she is part of a team that has trained over 600 interdisciplinary clinician-leaders in medical error disclosure nationally, and is currently developing a new educational paradigm for "Patients as Teachers" in inter-professional training sessions on patient safety. Her interest in involving patients directly in medical education and transparent medical care also extends to her efforts on OpenNotes, a clinical technologic innovation that allows doctors to share their visit notes directly with their patients, and creates a new platform for "360 degree evaluation" that incorporates direct feedback from patients. Dr. Bell has received several teaching awards, and is a member of Academy of Medical Education at Harvard Medical School. She lectures internationally and her work in medical education can be found in the New England Journal of Medicine, Academic Medicine, and the New York Times.

Heidi Blake, MD

Dr. Heidi Blake practices palliative medicine Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. Her academic interests include patient-physician communication, particularly how the cultivation of mindfulness may improve communication. Along with fellow KSG Associate Faculty member Michelle Dossett, she is co-leading a pilot program for internal medicine interns this year, which focuses on developing mindfulness in clinicians with the aim of promoting professionalism, humanism, quality care, and physician well-being in trainees.

Mary Buss, MD

Dr. Buss is clinically active as both a palliative care physician and an oncologist, with a focus on improving the integration of palliative care into cancer care. In her clinical roles, she enjoys an active role in teaching oncology fellows and Internal Medicine housestaff. She is the Director of the Hematology/Oncology medical student elective at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) and coordinates the palliative care rotation for the Anesthesia Pain fellows. Dr. Buss received her undergraduate degree in Bio-Medical Ethics from Williams College and her medical degree from Georgetown University School of Medicine. She completed Internal Medicine residency at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center where she was stayed on an additional year as a Chief Medical Resident before coming to Boston where she completed a medical oncology fellowship at BIDMC followed by a Palliative Medicine fellowship at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.  Upon completing her post-graduate medical education, she was awarded a research training grant as part of the Program in Cancer Outcome Research, funded by the NIH.  During the two years of this support, she earned her MPH at the Harvard School of Public Health, completed a national survey of palliative care education among oncology fellowship programs and began an investigation into the impact of delirium on patients and caregivers at the end of life. She has also recently led a project to develop a palliative care service for outpatients at BIDMC.

Rafael Campo, MD 

Dr. Campo is the director of BIDMC’s Office of Multicultural Affairs. His scholarly interests relate to narrative and medicine, the use of literature (and other humanities resources) in medical education, and cross-cultural issues in medical education and clinical practice. He is a well-known contemporary American poet and essayist, and has received several literary awards including the 2013 Hippocrates Prize for Poetry and Medicine. He also serves as Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. His primary care practice in Healthcare Associates serves mostly Latinos, gay/lesbian/bisexual/transgendered people, and people with HIV infection. Dr. Campo graduated magna cum laude from Amherst College before attending Harvard Medical School and receiving his MD. He completed his residency in Primary Care Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. He is also a graduate of Boston University’s Creative Writing Program, where he received the George Starbuck Fellowship and studied with US Poet Laureate Robert Pinsky and Nobel Laureate Derek Walcott. 

 

Rob Cohen, MD

Michael Curry, MD

Dr. Curry is Medical Director of Liver Transplantation at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. He graduated from the National University of Ireland, Galway in 1992 and completed residency at University College Hospital Galway and Gastroenterology Fellowship at St. Vincent's University Hospital in Dublin. He also completed an advanced Hepatology fellowship at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and has been a faculty member in the Department of Medicine and Gastroenterology since 2002. Dr Curry is an extremely busy clinician managing a large population of patients with end stage liver disease, evaluating patients for liver transplantation and caring for liver transplant recipients. He teaches medical students, internal medicine residents, gastroenterology and hepatology fellows and co-directs the advanced hepatology fellowship program at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.
Dr Curry has published over 30 original research papers and over 20 reviews and book chapters in areas related to viral hepatitis, end stage liver disease and liver transplantation. His main research interest is the outcomes of patients waiting for liver transplantation with specific interest in quality of life. He has served on the United Network for Organ Sharing Liver and Intestinal Committee and also the New England Consortium for liver transplantation.
Dr Curry has received awards from the National University of Ireland at Galway, the Irish Medical Organization, the American Association for Study of Liver Disease and has received the Katherine Swan Ginsburg Faculty Award in 2011 from the Department of Medicine at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.

Tom Delbanco, MD

Dr. Deblanco is the Richard and Florence Koplow - James Tullis Professor of General Medicine and Primary Care, Harvard Medical School. Until 2002, he was Chief of the Division of General Medicine and Primary Care at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, a unit he created and led for more than 30 years. Educated at Harvard College and the Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons, Dr Delbanco trained in internal medicine at Bellevue, Harlem, and Presbyterian Hospitals in New York. In 1971, he came to Beth Israel Hospital in Boston and created one of the first primary care practice and teaching programs at an academic health center. Today, Healthcare Associates provides for more than 100,000 patient visits annually and serves 400 patients with HIV infection.
In 1974, Dr Delbanco developed one of the first residency training programs in general internal medicine and primary care, and in 1979 he created and led the Harvard Medical School Faculty Development and Fellowship Program that has now trained more than 250 general internists for academic careers.
In 1978, he spent a year in Congress as a Robert Wood Johnson Health Policy Fellow. Dr. Delbanco has directed three Salzburg Seminars, the first on alcoholism, the second on AIDS, and the third, 'Through the Patient's Eyes,' developing a health system that focuses on the patient perspective. One of 5 founders of the Society of General Internal Medicine, an organization of 3,000 physicians and social scientists in academic general internal medicine, he served as its President in 1986. He has been a Council member of the American Public Health Association, served on the Program Committee of the Institute of Medicine, and was a director of the National Public Health and Hospitals Institute. He was the founding Chair of the Picker Institutes in the USA and Europe, organizations that document patient experiences with care and work with patients to improve health services.
An internist who practiced at the BIDMC for 40 years, Dr Delbanco is the author of numerous scholarly papers and has co-edited three books: Alcoholism: A Guide for the Primary Care Physicians; Manual of Clinical Evaluation: Strategies for Cost-Effective Care; and, Through the Patients' Eyes. Writer and Director of an award-winning film and educational DVD, "When Things Go Wrong: Voices of Patients and Families," he was featured in Bill Moyers' television series and book, Healing and the Mind, and is senior editor of a monthly case study series, "Clinical Crossroads," published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). In 1998, Dr. Delbanco was named a Master of the American College of Physicians, and in 2003, he received the Robert J. Glaser Award, the highest honor awarded by the Society of General Internal Medicine. In 2006, Harvard Medical School gave him the William Silen Lifetime Achievement in Mentoring Award.   Currently, Dr Delbanco and his colleague, Jan Walker, are leading "OpenNotes," a national effort to promote and examine the impact of increasing transparency in care by inviting patients to read and contribute to their medical records. Dr Delbanco's interests also extend into music. An avid violinist since age 9, he has long studied the history of the violin and is an occasional concert reviewer for the Boston Music Intelligencer.

Reed Drews, MD

Dr. Drews is Director of the Hematology-Oncology Fellowship Program at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC). After graduating from Harvard Medical School (HMS) in 1983, he served as internal medicine intern and resident, Chief Medical Resident, and clinical and research fellow in hematology-oncology at Beth Israel Hospital (BIH) from 1983-1989. In 1989 he joined the BIH (now BIDMC) Hematology-Oncology Division as faculty member, where he pursues clinical practice in hematology-oncology, teaches medical students, internal medicine residents, and hematology-oncology fellows, and carries out scholarly activities in the specialty of hematology-oncology. In addition to his role as Program Director for the BIDMC Hematology-Oncology Fellowship since 1997, he has served as Associate Director of Education for the Hematology-Oncology Division at BIDMC (since 1997), Assistant Chief of Medicine for Medical Student Education in the Department of Medicine at BIDMC (2001-2008), and Co-Director of the Core Medicine I Clerkship for 3rd-year Harvard Medical students rotating at BIDMC (1997-2008). In 2001 he received the S. Robert Stone Award for Excellence in Teaching at BIDMC and the Stephen H. Robinson, M.D. Memorial Teaching Award for Excellence in Teaching in Hematology-Oncology at BIDMC. In 2003, 2005, and 2007, he was a nominee for the HMS Faculty Prize for Excellence in Teaching (Years 3 & 4). In 2005 he became a Fellow of the American College of Physicians (ACP), serving as a member of the ACP's Scientific Program Subcommittee for the 2007, 2009 and 2011 Annual Sessions. In 2010 he became a member of the American Society of Hematology (ASH) Committee on Training Programs, and in 2011 he became a member of the ASH Medical Education Subcommittee and the ASH Annual Meeting Subcommittee. Since 1998, he has served as Section Editor of Complications of Cancer for UpToDate in Oncology.

Michelle Dossett, MD, PhD

Dr. Dossett is a board-certified internist practicing at Healthcare Associates, the primary care practice affiliated with Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) and a Research Fellow in Integrative Medicine within the Division of General Medicine and Primary Care at BIDMC.  Dr. Dossett attended medical school and completed a PhD in immunology at the University of Washington School of Medicine in Seattle, Washington. She completed her internship and residency in Internal Medicine at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, Massachusetts. She was a recipient of the Katherine Swan Ginsberg Humanism in Medicine Fellowship in both 2010 and 2011 for research projects examining the relationships among self-care habits and mindfulness with physician burnout, resilience, and empathy. In collaboration with Dr. Heidi Blake, Dr. Dossett is also developing and teaching a curriculum for internal medicine interns using mindfulness techniques, narrative, and the arts to promote mindful reflection and connect the skill of mindfulness with professionalism, improved quality of care, and improved physician well-being. In her spare time, Dr. Dossett enjoys journaling and writing essays and poems about her life experiences as a tool for personal reflection and growth, a practice which she began in high school. She also enjoys playing music, and during residency, she was known for her humorous parodies of old show tunes about life as a physician.

Grace Farris, MD

Dr. Farris graduated from Brown University in 2004 with a dual concentration in Spanish and Portuguese. She went on to graduate from Brown Medical School in 2008. She completed her internal medicine residency at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. Dr. Farris now sees patients as a hospitalist at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, and is part of the Katherine Swan Ginsburg Humanism in Medicine Program Associate Faculty. Her interests include professionalism in medicine, medical humanities and end of life care.

 

Jerome Groopman, MD

Dr. Groopman holds the Dina and Raphael Recanati Chair of Medicine at the Harvard Medical School and is Chief of Experimental Medicine at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. He attended medical school at Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York before serving his internship and residency in internal medicine at the Massachusetts General Hospital. His held two fellowship positions in hematology and oncology at the University of California, Los Angeles, and the Children’s Hospital/Sidney Farber Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School in Boston. In 2000, he was elected to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies. He writes regularly about biology and medicine for lay audiences as a staff writer at the New Yorker Magazine. Dr. Groopman’s research has focused on blood development, cancer and AIDS. Currently, his basic laboratory research involves understanding how blood and vascular cells grow, communicate, and migrate. He also is studying how viruses cause immune deficiency and cancer, the role of endocannabinoids in hematopoiesis, mechanisms of liver injury due to hepatitis C virus, and the effects of novel cell cycle inhibitors against mantle cell lymphoma.

 

Leonor Fernandez, MD

Dr. Fernandez is a general internist at BIDMC in the Division of General Medicine and Primary care and Assistant Professor in Medicine at Harvard Medical School. She received her BA from Princeton University and her MD degree from Albert Einstein College of Medicine. She completed her Internal Medicine training at Boston City Hospital, where she co-founded the Latino Clinic.  At BIDMC she serves as Associate Firm Chief for the Tullis Medical Firm where she plays a leading role in teaching medical residents. She also teaches the cultural competence curriculum for the Harvard Combined Orthopaedic Residency Program. Dr. Fernandez is Medical Director of Schwartz Rounds at BIDMC, a very well-attended inter-disciplinary forum on the human and social dilemmas in healthcare.
Dr. Fernandez' current work focuses on reducing disparities in health outcomes and she is the associate Course Director for a new Harvard CME course, "Getting to Equal: Strategies for Improving Care for All Patients". Her workshops are designed to teach communication skills and highlight institutional changes that help clinicians understand and transcend many common cultural, linguistic and social barriers in the doctor-patient relationship. She has particular expertise in the field of immigrant health and speaks many languages. She is married to George Philippides, a cardiologist, and they have two sons, ages 4 and 8.

Pamela Hartzband, MD 

Dr. Hartzband is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at the Harvard Medical School and Attending Physician in the Division of Endocrinology at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston. A magna cum laude graduate of Radcliffe College, Harvard University, she received her MD from Harvard Medical School. She served her internship and residency in internal medicine at the Massachusetts General Hospital, and her specialty fellowships in endocrinology and metabolism at the University of California, Los Angeles. Dr. Hartzband is a noted endocrinologist and educator specializing in disorders of the thyroid, adrenal, and pituitary glands and in women’s health. She is regularly featured among America’s Best Doctors.

Julie Knopp, NP 

Julie Knopp is the Associate Director for the Palliative Care Consultation Service and has been a team member since the service first started seeing patients in 2000.  An Adult Nurse Practitioner, Julie has worked at Beth Israel Hospital and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center for the past 26 years. She received her Bachelor of Science from the Univeristy of Rochester in New York and her Masters of Nursing Science from Simmons College in Massachusetts. She has a strong interest in working with patients with chronic illness and their families. Her work experience includes many years of providing home health care working as a visiting nurse, hospice nurse, and a nurse practitioner in a home-based primary care practice. She has been recognized several times for her passion and compassion in caregiving, including being named the first ever recipient of the Katherine Swan Ginsburg Faculty Award in 2010. 

Wendy McHugh, RN, MS

Ms. McHugh has been in professional practice as a Critical Care Nurse for over 2 decades included the evaluation, coordination and implementation of care to critically ill patients following trauma, cardiovascular, neurosurgical, vascular and general surgical procedures. Ms. McHugh participated in the seminar, Focus on Excellence, which encouraged the use of written clinical exemplars to evaluate and promote comprehensive, compassionate nursing care.  In 2004, following the completion of the Fellowship in Medical Ethics at Harvard Medical School, Ms. McHugh was appointed the first Clinical Nurse Ethicist at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. In this role, she provides individual ethics consultations to patients and staff members as part of The Ethics Support Service. She helped create the BIDMC Ethics Liaisons Program, which involves over 60 representatives from clinical and administrative departments throughout the medical center. As part of her role on the Ethics Support Service, Ms. McHugh coordinators and presents at the monthly Ethics Case Conference at BIDMC, attended by between 50-75 hospital staff members and facilitates monthly Ethics Rounds in a variety of intensive care units, clinics and in-patient wards at the medical center. In 2008 she joined the Intern Forum group where a social worker and a nurse meet with a firm of medical interns on a monthly basis to provide support and group conversation in a confidential setting and in 2011 she developed a program to educate and support eleven staff members who will become part of an ethics consult team. Ms. McHugh also provides in-service ethics education to various groups of volunteers and provides mentorship to ethics fellows in training. As a member of the Ethics Advisory Committee she assists in policy development and program evaluation. Wendy began working with the Critical Care Health Care Quality group in 2008, conducting satisfaction surveys by interviewing the families of critical care patients using the validated tool of the FS-ICU. As the Coordinator of the Person-Centered Care Project she provides leadership on a team that utilizes these surveys, in conjunction with the advice from the ICU Patient and Family Council, to create and implement ICU quality initiatives.

Laura Rock, MD

Dr. Rock is an Instructor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School (HMS) and an attending physician in the Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC).  Dr. Rock's professional activities include attending in the Medical Intensive Care Unit, teaching, and communication education research. As the Director of the Simulation Core Faculty in the Department of Medicine, she designs and teaches numerous courses for learners ranging from students to faculty, including: communication with family of critically ill patients, interprofessional code leadership and team training, 'rapid response training,' individual training in clinical decision making and communication, central line insertion, and pulmonary procedures. She is a co-investigator and faculty director for a simulation-based course to teach residents leadership and communication skills for family meetings in the Medical Intensive Care Unit (MICU). The course, and related research project, emphasizes strategies to improve empathic behaviors and a patient-centered approach. She was selected as the 2011-2012 Putnam Scholar, a scholarship of the American Academy on Communication in Healthcare.  Dr. Rock is active in Harvard Medical School courses as a tutorial leader and preceptor as well as integrating simulation into preclinical pathophysiology courses. She received the Harvard Medical School Excellence in Tutoring Award in 2009, an award granted by students' evaluations.  Other teaching responsibilities include teaching medicine house staff and critical care fellows in the medical intensive care unit. Dr. Rock has several educational interests including the use of high fidelity simulation and providing feedback with an emphasis on curiosity and respect in the simulation and clinical setting. Dr. Rock's clinical practice involves serving as the attending physician in the MICU.

Amy Ship, MD

Amy N. Ship, MD is an internist and educator at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. She received a B.A.with Honors in English Literature from Swarthmore College, an M.A. in Art History from Columbia University, and her M.D. from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Before becoming a doctor, she did curatorial work at two major art museums and was a reporter for a national newspaper. She completed her residency in Internal Medicine at Beth Israel Hospital and served as Chief Resident in Primary Care. She has completed two fellowships in Medical Education at the Shapiro Institute for Medical Education at BIDMC. For more than a decade, she has co-directed the BIDMC site for Harvard Medical School's introduction to clinical skills course, called "Patient-Doctor II.," teaching history-taking, examination skills, presentation, write-ups, and clinical reasoning, as well as professionalism and "doctoring." She has taught since 2004 in the "Primary Care Clerkship," teaching a third year student in clinical practice sessions for a year, and she serves as a tutor for the 3rd year course, "Patient-Doctor III." Dr. Ship supervises the work of four medicine residents annually in weekly clinic sessions and teaches in the ambulatory medicine curriculum at BIDMC. Since 1999 Dr. Ship has been a Deputy Editor of the "Clinical Crossroads" conference series, published monthly in the Journal of the American Medical Association(JAMA). Dr. Ship lectures locally and nationally on diverse topics including "Giving Bad News," "Improving the Art of Physical Diagnosis," "Giving Effective Feedback," and "Primary Care for Breast Cancer Survivors." Since 2007, Dr. Ship has led workshops for clinicians using literature to facilitate discussion of complex issues and to enhance empathy. Currently, she facilitates the "Literature and Medicine" program sponsored by the Massachusetts Council for the Humanities at the Brigham and Women's Hospital. Dr. Ship has received numerous awards for teaching, mentoring, and humanism, and was the recipient of the Kenneth Schwartz Compassionate Caregiver of the Year Award in 2009 and the prestigious S. Robert Stone Award for Excellence in Teaching from Harvard Medical School and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in 2010.

Joseph Wright, MD 

Joe Wright is a primary care physician with a special focus in HIV, and an instructor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. He received his undergraduate degree from the University of California at Santa Cruz. From 1991 to 2001, he lived in San Francisco and worked first in community-based HIV prevention efforts and then as a community liaison for an HIV prevention and vaccine trials research group. He took pre-medical prerequisites at San Francisco State University, worked in an immunology lab at the National Insitutes of Health, and then attended Harvard Medical School, from which he graduated in 2007 with honors in a special field. He trained in internal medicine at the BIDMC, where he then also completed a HIV fellowship in 2010-11.  During medical school, and occasionally since then, he has been a commentator for National Public Radio's All Things Considered. As a resident, he received the Katherine Swan Ginsburg Award in 2010.