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Vitamins Might Reduce Mortality

Posted 10/14/2013

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  In all honesty, I am sharing this with a fair amount of skepticism. Put this study into to "too good to be true" box and remember what we all know about such things--if it is too good to be true, it probably isn't. On the other hand, taking a daily multivitamin is not a big hardship, and if this study holds up, it might help.

  A recent analysis from the Womens Health Intitiative suggests that older women (this usually means post menopausal women) who take a multivitamin with minerals daily have a reduced rate of mortality from breast cancer. This does contadict the usual current (note the word "current"--these things change all the time) wisdom that we do best by getting our necessary vitamins from food, not from tablets.

  But, here it is. You decide what you think:

Vitamins Might Reduce Breast Cancer Mortality Editors' Recommendations

Older women who developed invasive breast cancer while taking multivitamin supplements with minerals had a 30% lower rate of breast cancer mortality than women who did not take supplements, according to an analysis of data from the Women's Health Initiative (WHI). The finding was published online October 7 in Breast Cancer Research and Treatment.

"Our data suggest that multivitamins with minerals [MVM] have a protective role for women with breast cancer. Ours is the largest study of multivitamin supplements in postmenopausal breast cancer survivors, so we had a lot of power to uncover these associations," lead author Sylvia Wassertheil-Smoller, MD, distinguished university professor emerita of epidemiology and population health at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, in Bronx, New York.

However, there are questions about residual confounding, mainly focused on whether the women who were taking the supplements were generally healthier.

Read more: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/812466


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