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Cancer Moonshot

Posted 10/3/2016

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  You will remember all the publicity about VP Biden's speech regarding the Cancer Moonshot. The theory is that we can commit the same kind of energy and intellect and resources towards curing cancer that we spent on landing a man on the moon.

  Of course nothing is that simple (not that landing a man on the moon was so simple either), and there have been many questions about the goal. Here is a good summary from Medscape:

Catching Up with the Cancer Moonshot
Brenda Goodman

In his final State of the Union Address, President Obama charged Vice President Joe Biden with leading an effort to dramatically accelerate the pace of cancer research. The goal is to make 10 years’ worth of progress in half the time.
The program is called the Cancer Moonshot. It’s a reference to the U.S. push in the 1960s to be the first nation to put a man on the moon. It worked for space travel. Now the question is whether a big, government-funded initiative can turn the tide against cancer.
To find out, WebMD spoke to Walter Curran, MD, executive director of Winship Cancer Institute at Emory University in Atlanta. Curran will participate in a panel discussion on Wednesday at the annual Health Connect South conference in Atlanta called “Can the Cancer Moonshot Succeed?” The interview has been edited for clarity and length.
WebMD: What’s happened with the Cancer Moonshot so far?
Curran: Biden has been very busy and very engaged to learn all he can about the current state of cancer research in the country. He convened a panel that’s referred to as a blue ribbon panel to define priorities for this effort. The blue ribbon panel came out with this report just last week [Sept. 7].
All of us who have been involved with that are reviewing the recommendations and seeing what we think makes senseand what doesn’t make sense. I think it’s been an exciting process

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/869267_print

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